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The purpose of “The Goose Call” is to better connect parents, faculty, staff and the community at large with Goose Creek ISD by sharing a variety of stories from and about stakeholders of the district.

“The Goose Call” aims to inform, inspire and entertain people who want to know more about the inner workings of our district and how our collective efforts, as a district and a community, are helping to shape the lives of future generations.

While our guest bloggers do not necessarily represent the opinions of the district, all bloggers will have a positive story or message to share via “The Goose Call.”
  • GUIDELINES

    The purpose of “The Goose Call” is to better connect parents, faculty, staff and the community at large with Goose Creek ISD by sharing a variety of stories from and about stakeholders of the district. “The Goose Call” aims to inform, inspire and entertain people who want to know more about the inner workings of our district and how our collective efforts, as a district and a community, are helping to shape the lives of future generations.


    While our guest bloggers do not necessarily represent the opinions of the district, all bloggers will have a positive story or message to share via “The Goose Call.”

    FOR EXAMPLE, WE WILL NOT:

    • Endorse any candidate running for a public office
    • Discuss specific and personal personnel actions
    • Allow crude or unacceptable language
    • Publish any blog that may be perceived as a personal attack, even if the person or department is not specifically named

    WE WILL:
    • Celebrate diversity
    • Educate our stakeholders
    • Honor our students and staff

    Readers may submit blog posts, but all blogs must be approved by representatives of the Communications department of GCCISD. We reserve the right to edit blogs and to choose not to post any content which does not meet our guidelines.
    • Keep blogs under 1,000 words.
    • Your headline and first sentence are crucial. Make them sizzle.
    • Everyone loves a list. If there is a way to organize your post with bullets and numbers, do it! This makes it easier for readers to skim over your post and avoids a “wall of text.”
    • If you submit a blog and it’s accepted, please feel free to share it via your own social media channels once it has been posted.
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The Goose Call – GCCISD Blog TIPS
Part 2: What happens when you ask #GCCISD students questions about Christmas?
12/19/2017

Have you heard of a reindeer named Marshall? Watch what #GCCISD kids has to say when we asked them questions about Christmas.


Part 1: What happens when you ask #GCCISD students questions about Christmas?
12/13/2017

 

 

Kids say the funniest things! To celebrate the season, we visited elementary schools in #GCCISD and asked them questions about Christmastime and holiday traditions.


The Role Music Education Plays in Elementary School
11/29/2017

teacher and children playing instruments

More than a melody or note, music education in younger years prepares students for life.

 

The Role Music Education Plays in Elementary School

 

By Laura Garcia, Music Teacher at Mirabeau B. Lamar Elementary

 

Laura Gracia photo Laura Garcia, Music Teacher

As a music educator, I often get asked “What is the one thing you want your students to remember about music?” My reply is that I always tell my students, “Music will always be there for you and never let you down.” While we hope children create positive relationships with their family, friends and teachers, one relationship we may have not considered is their relationship with music.

When we think about music, we assume it is just about what we hear on the radio, tv, in movies or even what is on our iPod. However, it is so much more. Think about it: music gives us so many emotions throughout the ups and downs of our life, it plays such a crucial part. Since birth, music has been around. When it is time to enter elementary school, will prepare studentsfor their important studies of Reading, Math, Science, Social Studies, etc.

Fortunately, music education is taught in most public schools. As elementary music educators, it is our responsibility to create and build the foundation of music to all our students. We teach them so much about music from kindergarten through 5th grade. This includes singing, playing instruments, dancing, music appreciation, learning about rhythms, musical terms, steady beats, how to read notes and how to perform in front of a live audience.

While students are learning their academic studies, students in the music class are learning how it relates to their classroom lessons. These are just a few examples

  • Learning to read music is like learning to read a sentence or story; a song also can tell a story.
  • Studying the music rhythms relates to Math
  • Understanding why some music was written relates to Social Studies
  • Playing an instrument and listening to the way is sounds connects to Science

In addition to the importance music education connects to academics, it is also important students learn to have an appreciation for it. They will recognize how much music is around their lives. Such as…

  • On Radio/Television/Movie soundtracks
  • At Church and Religious services
  • For their own listening enjoyment/entertainment
  • For Parties/Family gatherings
  • During Seasonal/Holiday Times of the year 4th of July/Veterans Day – Patriotic Music or Winter Season- Christmas/Hanukkah/Kwanza)

In elementary school, students have music class 1-2 times a week for approximately 45 minutes. During this time, music educators do their best to teach what they can about music and most importantly, let students have fun! They will also have the opportunity to perform for their family and peers. This is also a life-long learning lesson that can help tackle that infamous stage fright and build confidence in themselves.

Music also has a role in helping build relationships with one another and plays an essential role in the development of social skills. After all, it is known the universal language. It brings people together, makes them feel better and creates a sense of unity.

At the elementary level, students can also audition for choirs, music competitions, or even a performing ensemble, such as recorder, hand bell or percussion. These vary at each campus and can help enhance the learning of music at an early age. More detailed examples include:

  • Choir- Choral Ensemble that performs for the school or community
  • UIL Music Memory Team- A Competition that 4th or 5th graders can compete with students in their district. It is an in-depth study of music literature taken from a wide variety of music genres to expose students to great composers and their music
  • Any other performing ensemble the elementary music educator would like to offer at their campus

Furthermore, this is a fundamental part when students enter secondary education. When students exit elementary school into junior high and high school, they can spend more time learning about music education every day if they choose. They can join choir, band or orchestra. Music educators at the secondary level help them branch out into a completely higher level of music education. Therefore, building such a solid foundation is so important; it carries with each child as they leave elementary school.

Even if students don’t choose to go down the music education path, there are other paths they can take, such as joining art, theatre arts, sports, etc. However, it is hoped that whatever route they take, music will always be an important part of their lives. Maybe music will motivate them as they work out to be in athlete, calm them as they study or relax, participate in their church choir or even be used as a form of entertainment. Either way, music educators hope music brings some sort of positivity in their life.

In closing, the role music education has elementary school is so essential. Even though a six or nine-year-old may not fully understand the concept of the quote, “Music will never let you down and will always be there for you,” music educators aspire for students to understand the impact music has. Maybe when they are older, they will see that music is more than just a simple melody or tune; it is an important and reliable part of their lives. 


What are you thankful for?
11/16/2017

 

It’s been quite a year, but there is always something to be grateful for.

We asked around #GCCISD to see what people are giving thanks for as we approach Thanksgiving Day.


Things that deaf and hard of hearing people want you to know
10/18/2017


Deaf education in the United States is largely credited to Reverend Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet, Laurent Clerc and Mason Cogswell, who co-founded the first institution for the education of the deaf, which opened on April 15, 1817. Together, they created an educational movement that is still growing strong today.

GCCISD serves as the fiscal agent for the Tri-County East Regional Day School Program for the Deaf, serving 170 deaf and hard of hearing children from GCCISD and 16 surrounding school districts including: Anahuac, Barbers Hill, Channelview, Cleveland, Crosby, Dayton, Deer Park, Devers, Galena Park, Hardin, Hull-Daisetta, La Porte, Liberty, Pasadena, Sheldon, and Tarkington.

Watch a short video to learn more about what deaf and hard of hearing students want you to know.

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